Funny Things #HeardonRT66 and a New Personal Record

I remember my first half marathon. I ran it in 2009 as a challenge to myself to see if I could do it. I didn’t have kids at the time and I don’t know what in the heck I was doing with my free time but I didn’t stick to my training plan or cross training and ended up with multiple injuries. I hobbled my way through that race and loathed the entire experience. I checked it off my bucket list and didn’t really think about running another half marathon until this year.

2015 started with me making a promise to myself to get my physical and emotional health back on track. After two kids and a serious bout of postpartum depression, I still felt like a stranger in my own body. I didn’t recognize the spare tire around my mushy mid section and was riddled with anxiety. In January, I decided to get in shape. Like, really get in shape. So I decided to sign up for the Route 66 Half Marathon. I would give myself plenty of time to train and incorporate strength training and cross training to be sure to prevent injuries this time. Eleven months later, I found myself at the start line of the Route 66 Half Marathon feeling mentally and physically healthy, strong, and injury free.

Photo Cred: Rt 66

This was the first time I had ever run the Route 66 Half Marathon and I really wasn’t sure what to expect. I had been warned about the hills and I’m glad I was. I had prepared and trained for them. I repeated my mantra for 90% of the race. “Your quads were made for hills. Your strong legs can handle these hills.” And luckily, the hills made the course more interesting. It was more like an interval run rather than a flat, pounding tempo run. The only time the hills were a problem was at mile 12 when my legs were shredded, my knee was aching, and my feet were cramped up (I think I tied my shoelaces too tight and didn’t know it cause my feet were frozen at the start line).

Photo Cred: RT 66

I had effectively trained for the hills. However, I wasn’t prepared for the ruckus of this particular race. There was crowd support basically the entire course. And I don’t mean just clapping and cowbells. I mean beer flinging, jello-shot having, loud music blaring dance parties along the course. There were live bands at some locations, cheerleaders at others. The city of Tulsa was seemingly completely taken over by this race, its participants, and its supporters.
So I disconnected. I took my earphones out, and put my phone away. I didn’t listen to any music. I didn’t have the voice of the Strava lady telling me my pace and distance. I didn’t need any of that. I wasn’t pushing for a pace. I was running by how I felt and enjoying the fun along the course; talking to other runners, high-fiving supporters. It was exactly what I needed. On that race, I was just running for the fun of it. Celebrating the reasons I signed up for the race in the first place; to be happy and healthy. And I couldn’t believe it. I crossed the finish line and had a new personal record. I had beat my test run half marathon time earlier this year by about 20 seconds. 

Because I didn’t have my headphones in, I eaves dropped on many conversations. Some of the conversations were mundane, some sad, some funny, some disgusting (there is no shame about bodily functions for runners). Here are a few of the gems I heard along the course.

“What do you think the dog is doing right now? He’s either sleeping or licking himself.”
I hope the dog was sleeping but as luck would have it he was probably licking himself.

“Hey handsome! You’re cute! Can I run with you for a little while?”
Who knew picking up a date during a race could be so easy.

“Why? Why do I do this to myself. Never again. Never again.”
Okay, this quote was from me at mile 8 and 9. It never fails. Mile 8 is where I break down. It’s my kryptonite.

“You know that porta-potty back there? Somebody pooped all over the floor.”
This guy kept talking but I couldn’t really hear him and I was too busy looking for poop on the bottom of his shoes.

Have you heard any funny, crazy, surprising things on the race course before?

Wow, what a difference from my first half marathon several years ago. I had so much fun at the Route 66 Half Marathon and am ready to sign up for next year. But that’s an entire year away and I’ve got the bug. I’m fully addicted to this half marathon thing. So what’s next? Maybe Rock n Roll Half Marathon in Dallas?

5 Things To Do Tonight To Make Your Morning Workout Easier

wakeupEach night you set your alarm telling yourself that TOMORROW is the day. Finally, you’ll get up early and make it to the gym. But when morning comes and that alarm goes off, your bed becomes the most comfortable place in the world. At that point, TOMORROW seems like the more appropriate morning to start working out. Don’t worry. You’re not alone. We’ve all been there.

Many of us have busy mornings and often time in the mornings is quite limited. But you can do yourself a favor by peforming the following 5 things each night to set yourself up for making it easier to get to the gym in the morning.

1. Chose your clothes for the next day

Picture it, it’s 4:30 in the morning and your trying to find socks that match and a clean shirt to wear to the gym. With all the fumbling around you’re now running late for that spin class at the Y and decide to just go back to bed. Just save yourself the trouble and set out your gym clothes the night before. Or join the group of folks that sleep in their gym clothes the night before. I mean, you’re going to get those clothes all sweaty at the gym anyways so one less thing to think about in the early morning and save yourself the extra laundry.

2. Prepare everything you’ll take out the door in the morning

There is nothing worse than scrambling to get out the door in the morning only to realize you forgot your headphones. So pull a small gym back together that has essentials like headphones, water bottle, deodorant, iPod, wallet, and your car keys. Leave the bag by the door so that it’s ready to go and you just have to remember to grab the one bag when you head out.

3. Visualize your wake up

Okay, this one is a little bit new-age, hocus-pocus but stay with me here. While laying in bed each night, visualize yourself waking up the next day at the time you want to wake up. For example, if you want to wake up at 6 A.M. you would visualize your clock changing from 5:59 to 6:00, your alarm sounding, and you waking up easily and refreshed. It’s like you are mentally setting a wake up call and oddly enough your brain follows through with the plan you visualized. I mean, you’re still setting your physical alarm but the mental preparation helps prevent the likelihood of snoozing the morning away. I know it may seem a little silly, but it works. And hey, it’s worth a try. I’ll only take a few minutes of your time to do the visualization so what’s there to lose?

4. Go to bed on time

Nothing will make it easier to get to the gym in the morning more than going to bed on time and getting a full night of rest. So put away that video game, turn off the Netflix binge watch, and go to be already.

5. Don’t go it alone

Do you have any friends looking to get fit too? Great! Join together and hold each other accountable. Whether it’s having someone else there to suffer along with you during your morning workout or that you know you’ll get so much flack for missing the work out that motivates you to get up in the morning is irrelevant. So get that work out buddy or join one of my challenge groups so that you can be held accountable to your goals.

Good luck tomorrow! Make the most of your morning. You’ll be glad you did.


(photo cred: David Mao)

Slow Cooker Chicken Enchilada Soup

Slow Cooker Chicken Enchilada Soup

What I love about this recipe is that it is sooo simple but packs big flavor. I also love to make this soup because it’s gentle on the wallet. Many of the ingredients I typically already have around in my pantry anyway so if I’m in a pinch, I throw this recipe in the ol’ slow cooker.


2 tsp olive oil
½ cup chopped onion
2 garlic cloves, minced
3 cups chicken broth
1 8oz can tomato sauce
1 15oz can no salt added black beans
1 14oz can fire roasted tomatoes
2 cups frozen corn kernels
1 tsp cumin
½ tsp ground oregano
1 pound chicken breast

For serving:
Tortilla strips or tortilla chips
Shredded cheddar or monterey jack cheese
Diced avocado, diced roma tomatoes, sour cream (optional)

Heat olive oil over medium heat, add onion and garlic, stirring until soft, about 3 minutes.
Add all ingredients to slow cooker.
Cover and cook on low for 6 hours.
Remove chicken from soup and shred,
Return to slow cooker.
Allow to cook until heated through.
Serve warm with tortilla strips and cheese and other optional ingredients.

chicken enchilada soup

4 DIY Running Costumes for the Procrastinator

So you’ve signed up for a race in Halloween costume race. Even though you planned and expertly executed your training, your plan for a costume is still lacking. Never fear, Run Oklahoma has some quick, easy, do-it-yourself costume ideas that even the best procrastinator can pull off.

Running Bandit – You’re dressed as a bandit and you’re running in a race. Get it?! Well, regardless of the cheese factor, Lia Griffith still came up with a totally easy costume to put together. Black leggings, black gloves, black hat, black mask, and a little fabric with a dollar symbol  and you’re ready to run in a completely functional costume.


Skeleton – What would a Halloween racing costume be without a spooky costume?  Well thank your lucky stars that Martha Stewart has you covered with a tutorial video and templates to create a skeleton rib cage cut out. Pair it with black running tights and if you’re feeling adventurous throw on some skeleton face paint as well.

skeleton costume

Pirate –  Pirate costumes can be easy to create AND conducive to running. Are you sensing a theme here? All you need are a few yards of your favorite pirate fabric. Cut it to create a head scarf and a sarong. Fray the edges of the fabric to give it that swashbuckler feel and you’re set. Photo from Another Mother Runner.

running pirates

Baker and Gingerbread Man – This idea is great for couples. All you need is an apron and rolling pin for the baker. The gingerbread man costume can be some inexpensive scrubs or sweats painted with fabric paint. Totally cute. Totally versatile. Run run just as fast as you can. You can’t catch me I’m the Gingerbread Man.


Slow Cooker Pork Carnitas

Pork carnitas are so versatile. They’re an easy and filling meal you can enjoy all year round. Sometimes when meals are cooked in the slow cooker all day they can end up bland and mushy. The chipotle peppers, spices, and juice come together nicely to create a slightly spicy and sweet heat that isn’t overpowering. After the first time I made these, they quickly became a family favorite.


  • 1 (3-pound) boneless pork shoulder, trimmed (I substitute pork loin cause I can get those packages of two for one at Sams)
  • 10 garlic cloves, sliced (Substitue 1 and 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder)
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3/4 cup orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 2 chipotle chiles canned in adobo sauce, drained and chopped
  • Fresh Salsa, pico de gallo, lime wedges, and Carb Smart tortillas for serving


  1. Combine garlic, cumin, oregano, salt, and pepper in a small bowl. Place roast in a 3 1/2 quart slow cooker. Sprinkle pork on all sides with spice mixture.
  2. Combine juices and chipotle chiles. Pour juice mixture over pork. Cover and cook on LOW for 8 hours or until pork is tender.
  3. Remove pork from slow cooker; shred with 2 forks. Skim fat from cooking liquid (if you use pork loin there will be no fat and very little cooking liquid). Combine Shredded pork and 1/2 cup cooking liquid; toss well.

Spoon pork into Carb Smart tortilla, top with salsa, pico de gallo, fresh lime juice. Serve with black beans, brown rice, or a sauté of corn and zucchini.

Adapted from Cooking Light Slow Cooker Tonight
Adapted from Cooking Light Slow Cooker Tonight


5 Tips to Eat Clean at Your Next Oklahoma Tailgate

This whole eating clean thing has been pretty easy all week. But now the weekend arrives and you’re about to partake in one of the best fall pastimes Oklahoma has to offer. You’re heading to a tailgate for your favorite Oklahoma football team. Here are a few simple tips so you can enjoy the tailgate and not derail all of the hard work you’ve put in the previous week.

  1. Never Arrive Hungry – Showing up to a tailgate with an empty belly only spells disaster. I know it sounds counterintuitive but if you fill up with a healthy snack before you leave the house you’ll be far less likely to over indulge in the beautiful glorious junk at the tailgate that will ultimately make you FEEL junkie. So make sure you eat a snake that contains a protein and a complex carbohydrate before leaving the house. Something like turkey and a whole grain cracker or a protein shake like Shakeology with fruit blended in.
  2. Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate – You’re at a tailgate. You and I both know you’re likely to indulge in an adult beverage or two. Make sure to alternate water with your beer, wine, or cocktail. This will cut down on alcohol consumption and empty calorie intake as well as keep you hydrated. Besides no one like that sloppy fan.
  3. Focus on Lean Protein – God bless a good tailgate that offers delicious protein packed foods such as lean beef, poultry, and beans. Try to avoid the refined carbs that go along with those proteins such as the white buns. And don’t be fooled by imposters like the processed meats such as hotdogs and cold cuts.
  4.  BYOV – Tailgates are not really known for their wide range of vegetable selections. So Bring Your Own Veggies.You can disguise your veggies as a delightful salad side dish like this Classic Cucumber & Tomato Salad from Skinny Ms. Since most people steer away from the veggies anyway, there’ll be plenty left for you to fill up on.Classic-Cucumber-Tomato-Salad
  5. Pick Your Favorite – You’ve done so well with sticking to your plan and then…  the desserts get rolled out. If you MUST have a sweet, there’s really no need to sample all of them. Zero in on your favorite of the options and allow yourself to indulge in one.

Good! You’ve navigated your way through the tailgate. Now go cheer on your team and burn some calories with all that jumping, screaming, and high-fiving.

OKC Marathon Winner: Getting to Know Scott Downard

scottdownardMany people are intimidated of the thought of running 26 consecutive miles. Even more people may be intimidated of running those 26 miles at a 5:47 average pace. But as I walked into OK Runner in Norman on a rainy afternoon I met a man who is not scared of those numbers and performed in such a way to win the 2015 Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon.

Scott Downard was working at OK Runner the day I happened to stop by and he was eager to help me with a question I had about some running apparel. As I paid closer attention I realized he looked familiar from the television coverage of the recent OKC Marathon, so I had to ask. He shyly admitted the he is THE Scott Downard and HAD recently won the OKC Marathon. Being a running fanatic, I must admit, I was a bit star struck. But really the best part of meeting such a notable athlete and runner was that he was extremely humble about his racing victories and seemed very content to just chat with me about running in general.

After our brief chat, Scott was happy to answer some questions for the readers of Run Oklahoma. I’m sure most of you, like me, are curious about what’s it’s like to be such a fast runner.

Q: How long have you been running? Was it a big part of your growing up?

A:  I’ve been running for half of my life, 16 years. It became a big part of my life in high school. Running is one of those pursuits that for some people can become an obsessive type of pastime. The first season I ran cross country, I wasn’t particularly good and my work ethic wasn’t great either. But I buddied up with another guy that was a lot better than me and he kind of helped instill some of the “OCD” runner behavior. I do get a little frustrated because I see a lot of the kids I coach and know they have every bit the capability I had and they just won’t commit to the training. That is the only thing that allowed me to get better and in a relatively brief period I could contribute to my varsity team. I view this sport as a lifestyle and I think it can be pretty cool to catch fire with a pursuit like this.

Q: What inspires you to run?

A:  I’m inspired to run on a variety of levels, I mean I like being fit and healthy and getting outside and exploring. I like the challenge it can offer, I like pushing boundaries and I like that I can figure a bit about my body and tinker with the variables and possibly refine the outcome of my effort. I like being around people that are into it for these reasons. I don’t necessarily like the competitive aspect, it’s more of an innate challenge for me.

Q: How many marathons have you won prior to this one?

A:  I actually own and set a course record at the Eisenhower Marathon 2 weeks prior to OKC. Full disclosure, there was a slight issue with one of my wins which I will attach an interview I did about that and not leave it to some of the less informed articles that later appeared. I also own and set the course record at the Lake McMurtry 50k trail run.

Q: What did it mean, to you, to be able to win the OKC Memorial marathon?

A:  I was happy to FINALLY win. I’ve given it a go there a few times and was fortunate to get the W. I never take anything for granted in marathons. People ask me about meaning beyond the victory and I obviously understand the significance of the bombing commemoration but this is also THE Oklahoma race that has started to mean a lot for fitness in our community and state. I think that’s the way I view the event, a great event that I hope continues to evolve and grow, there definitely room for that.

Q: What was your plan of attack for the OKC course?

A:  I planned to race whoever showed up, but potentially run a little more conservatively and ramp the pace down the last 10 miles. I wasn’t really able to pull the speed down but you race to the course and your competition.

Q: It was reported that you had an asthma attack during the race. Is that true? How were you able to cope/recover?

A:  I was having gradually worsening asthma problems the last 6-8 miles. I have dealt with it before in spring races and so I packed my inhaler. I’ve had some previous races derailed and it can make for a demoralizing and lonely last 10k. The inhaler is as much of a psychological tool as physical. I’m learning to try to breath and run a little differently to try to cope as well. I think it made the pace feel more difficult and thus my stomach was a little more unsettled. These things are all linked so I couldn’t fuel as well as could have been hoped and hydrating was not great because I feared a side ache.

Q: Were you able to take a moment during the race to enjoy the hometown crowd?

A:  I enjoyed the support but I was motivated to win and not entirely confident of my chances, so you try to conserve your energy mostly. I threw out lots of smiles, waves, and a few high fives to some buddies.

Q: How did you celebrate after the win?

A:  I was somewhat dehydrated afterward which upsets my stomach and a lot of the post race options provided don’t do it for me. I finally got my miracle cure, beer, far too much later and things started to improve from there. My family and girlfriend know that I sometimes am in a rough state after and so when we go out if I say that I need to lay down or am feeling nauseous, they know I’m serious, but usually it can pass fairly quickly once I absorb some fluids, but too much sugary sports drink or plain water usually exacerbate the problem. I basically ended up throwing up what I initially tried to get down, laying on the couch at Mcnellies until they finally brought me a beer.

I didn’t do any massive celebrating but I did chat with friends and my buddy, and last years winner, Jason Cook and I usually go get a celebratory drink or 2. I also have to point out that my high school English teacher and her family happened by us and she bought me a pint(so far my most substantive reward, as OKC offers zero prizes for winners) and said she had seen the tv coverage of the race. I’ve also received a ton of congrats from old friends, family, acquaintances, random Facebook friend requests, etc. We also had a get together this past weekend with my coworkers including Scott Smith, who won the 1/2 to celebrate everyone’s OKC experience.

Q: What’s your dream race that you’d want to run?

A: I would like to run a couple of the marathon majors(Berlin, Tokyo), some really cool destination events( Big Sur, Avenue of the Giants,etc), and a few of the big trail ultras. I’m still attempting to get faster and attempt some longer events, I’m 32, but I also like to travel and make the most of my races. I still think it’s important to mix up your race schedule at times and prepare specifically for goal events a few times a year.

Q: What’s the next big race on your calendar?

A: I’m trying to get in some faster 5/10k type training this summer and then be fired up about training for a fast fall marathon(maybe 2) like Chicago, Philly or Cal international marathons. I had interest in competing at the US 50mile(an as yet unattempted distance for me)champs which are taking place in northern Wisconsin, where my girlfriend is from, but the high school coaching season won’t be conducive to that feat.

Many of us dream about just finishing top three in our gender or our age group in a race, and can’t even fathom winning  the whole shebang. Scott has managed to take the title in many races and still has his sites set on further achievements. Good luck to Scott in his future efforts as I’m sure the Run Oklahoma Community will be following and cheering along.

Camille Herron 2015 OKC Marathon Winner

Camille Herron – Third Time OKC Memorial Marathon Winner – Interview

It’s been over a week since more than 25,000 participants toed the starting line, running to remember the 168 people killed in the 1995 Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building bombing. The Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon is truly a memorable event and runners in this event continue to make history such as female marathon winner, Camille Herron. Camille won in 2012, 2014 and crossed the finish line at 2:54:55 this year becoming the race’s only third time champion.
Camille Herron 2015 OKC Marathon Winner
Camille, 33, is a professional athlete who has won 18 marathons. Two weeks prior to the 2015 Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon she was named to the U.S. National Team and won the national title for top marathon runners.
But don’t let the intimidating racing record fool you. Camille is an extremely gracious pro athlete. She has a passion for running and wants to see it expand here in Oklahoma as demonstrated by her willingness to allow interview her. She kindly took time out of her busy schedule to answer a few questions about her favorite part of the course and how she celebrated her third victory.
Q: What did it mean, to you, to be able to wind the OKC Memorial Marathon for a third time?
A: I had noticed a few months ago looking at past winners that no one had won the OKC Memorial 3 times. My husband, Conor, has won it twice. To have now won it a 3rd time is making a bit of history! I have plenty of race opportunities that I could pursue around this time (including the 100K US Championship I just did 2 wks before), but I choose to run my “hometown race” because I know how much it means to my friends and family. I want to be an inspiration to them and the greater Oklahoma endurance community. Also, being a native Oklahoman I know how much it means to everyone to continue to “run to remember” the OKC Bombing– I was discovering my talent as a competitive runner 20 yrs ago, so it’s symbolic and coming full circle to still be running competitively and now for a greater cause and purpose.
Q: You mentioned being able to really soak in sites and sounds of the race? Do you have a favorite area/stretch of road on the course?

A: I like running through all the historical neighborhoods– the first 10 miles and then the last 6-8 miles. I’m probably not alone in having a love-hate relationship with Lake Hefner!

Q: How did you celebrate your third win? A fancy dinner or a long nap?
A: A post-race nap and then the annual party at Mark Bravo’s house, although we came a little later than everyone cause of our nap!

Q: Your win came two weeks after a 100K run, what is your plan for recovering?
A: This was my first time running an ultra in the US, so I really didn’t know what to expect bouncing back from the 100K. I took more days off and less running than expected between the two races, mainly because I was sleepy and had the appetite of a 14 year old boy! My muscles weren’t that sore after the 100K. It was mainly metabolic/endocrine fatigue I felt going into OKC Memorial– I didn’t have the “umph” to push myself hard and felt flat. Since OKC Memorial, I took several more days completely off from running, eating like a horse, sleeping a whole bunch, and then did some “vacation running” up in Oregon. Now I’m feeling ready to build back into regular training.
Q: What’s the next big race on your calendar?
A: I haven’t planned any immediate races yet– I actually decided not to do Comrades at the end of May, so it’s opened up a huge window to train and/or do domestic races the next two months. Then, my next major race to build towards will be the World 100K Championship in The Netherlands in September. I’m currently #1 in the World for 100K, so I want to be healthy, rested, and fit for this race. There’s several possibilities to pursue American/World Records next fall from 50K and up, so I’d like to get myself into prime marathon fitness. Finally, I’ll carry the fitness into training for the 2016 Olympic Marathon Trials next February in LA.
Remember the Ten on Hall of Fame Ave

Remember the Ten Run Race Recap

On January 27, 2001, ten members of the Oklahoma State University basketball team perished in a plane crash. It was an tragic event that rocked the small university community as well as the entire state. On April 21st 2007, a race was organized for a community to come together and remember those that were lost.

Over the past nine years the event has grown to a field of over 1,200 participants with proceeds benefiting the OSU Counseling and the RT10 Scholarship Program.  Remember the Ten Run is one of the few races in this state that openly benefits mental health services and discusses topics such as loss, sadness, and depression. Even though the overlying topics of the event are serious, the event itself is a great celebration of athletics and community.

In addition to the run, the day is filled with the spring football game and Stillwater Arts Festival. So there are plenty of attractions for the entire family. Besides, you can always stop by Eskimo Joe’s for an order of chili-cheese fries and hang with Joe and Buffy.

remember the ten eskimo joes buffy and joe

The race course winds in and out of Oklahoma State University campus, fraternity/sorority row, and surrounding business and houses. The first mile takes you west on Hall of Fame Ave. Because the 10K and 5K runners all start together it’s a big jumbled mess of different paces, walkers and runners. Once you curve on to Western road, it’s a nice down hill stretch. It’s a great point to pick up the pace because the 5K runners are starting to turn off on to their own course and the road opens up on the 10K course with fewer runners. Mile three takes you through a residential area with sporadic spectators comprised of college students, young families, and retirees out supporting the runners. I happily accepted high-fives and cheers from college students and grade schoolers alike. Mile four drops you through some of the fraternity and sorority houses as well as some of the local bars on the strip. As the course turns north on Knoblock Street it passes three of my most favorite things, Chris’ University Spirit Shop (my favorite spot to buy OSU gear), Hideaway Pizza (I could live on ‘za alone), and my boo thang (a.k.a. husband who was nice enough to hang with me and snap some pics).

Remember the Ten running

Miles five and six wind you back out west of campus then east again to pass through campus as you run past the library and Boone Picken Stadium to cross the finish line just south of Gallagher-Iba Arena. The winner of the race was Normanite, Scott Downard with a 5:15 pace finishing in 32:40. That’s the 10K folks. I still can’t wrap my mind around the fact that people run the same routes as me at twice my speed and don’t immediately die afterwards. It’s crazy. I placed 195th overall, 80th out of all women, and 15th in my age group with an average pace of 10:06 and overall time of 1:02:50. Not too shabby for me. I’m chipping away at pace and distance. Just trying to get faster at those longer distances.


Ultimately, the course was flat with lots of great  scenery around OSU’s campus. But what made this course stellar was the numerous amount of volunteers. The friendly folks at the registration table, the pace dividers at the starting line, course managers directing runners and traffic, and the oh-so-wonderfull water station volunteers throughout the course made it a safe and enjoyable atmosphere. Also, I didn’t hate the sweet swag that came with the reasonable race entry fee.   

It was a great race, for a good cause, on a beautiful Oklahoma spring day. I couldn’t ask for anything more.